Leveraging the power of
art
and
design
to advance the front lines of
social justice




Imperialism


Revolution Books +
Dread Scott


Dread Scott and Revolution Books

Imagine a world without imperialism.




If you can conceive of a world without America – without everything America stands for and everything it does in the world – then you’ve already taken great strides and begun to get at least a glimpse of a whole new world.

   

 

 

If you can envision a world without any imperialism, exploitation, oppression – and the whole philosophy that rationalizes it – a world without division into classes or even different nations, and all the narrow– minded, selfish, outmoded ideas that uphold this; if you can envision all this, then you have the basis for proletarian internationalism. And once you have raised your sights to all this, how could you not feel compelled to take an active part in the world historic struggle to realize it; why would you want to lower your sights to anything less?

 

BAsics from the Talks and Writings of Bob Avakian; quote 1:31



Collaborators


Revolution Books


People come to Revolution Books from all over the world to find books that explain why the world is the way it is, and to actualize the possibility of a radically different way the world could be. At the heart of Revolution Books is the new communism developed by the revolutionary leader, Bob Avakian. Scientific and poetic, wrangling and visionary, Revolution Books is the political, intellectual and cultural center of a movement for an actual revolution.


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Dread Scott


Dread Scott makes revolutionary art to propel history forward. He first received national attention in 1989 when his art became the center of controversy over its use of the American flag, while he was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work is in the collections of the Whitney Museum, the New Museum of Contemporary Art (NY) and the Akron Art Museum, and has been included in recent exhibitions at MoMA PS1, the Walker Art Center and the Brooklyn Museum.


Dread Scott photo




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